Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Participating in HIV Prevention Clinical Trial: Reasons and Experiences among Female Participants in Antibody Mediated Prevention Study at UNC Project, Lilongwe, Malawi

Version 1 : Received: 30 April 2020 / Approved: 2 May 2020 / Online: 2 May 2020 (13:45:36 CEST)

How to cite: Holla, R.; Muula, A. Participating in HIV Prevention Clinical Trial: Reasons and Experiences among Female Participants in Antibody Mediated Prevention Study at UNC Project, Lilongwe, Malawi. Preprints 2020, 2020050014 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0014.v1). Holla, R.; Muula, A. Participating in HIV Prevention Clinical Trial: Reasons and Experiences among Female Participants in Antibody Mediated Prevention Study at UNC Project, Lilongwe, Malawi. Preprints 2020, 2020050014 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0014.v1).

Abstract

Aim: The overall aim of the study was to assess the reasons and experiences of participants involved in Antibody Mediated Prevention (AMP) HIV prevention clinical trial at University of North Carolina (UNC) Project, Lilongwe, Malawi. We determined the participants’ reasons for participating in HIV Prevention clinical trials; and the experiences of participants in HIV Prevention clinical trials. Methods: We adopted the qualitative cross-sectional study method. Data were collected using in-depth interviews (IDIs). Purposive sampling was used to select 12 study participants who consented to take part in the study. All participants were the ones taking part in the AMP HIV prevention study at the UNC Project. Data analysis was done concurrently with data collection using content analysis. Results: Individuals were motivated to participate in HIV research due to a range of perceived benefits. These included personal, health, and financial benefits. Participants' research experiences and their continued participation in HIV research were influenced by the research clinic context and the nature of their interactions with research staff. Conclusion: When the clinical trial study participants’ expectations are met through what they experience in the study, the chances of them adhering to the study visits and procedures are high. Even for those who did not have any expectations prior to the study, feeling welcomed and being able to open up to the study staff encouraged their continued participation. In the end, this outweighed the negative comments made by the people in their communities or their friends

Subject Areas

HIV/AIDS; community health worker; clinical trial; informed consent; HIV positive; STI

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