Preprint Communication Version 2 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Meta-Analysis: COVID-19 Disease Severity Correlates with Smoking Status

Version 1 : Received: 22 April 2020 / Approved: 24 April 2020 / Online: 24 April 2020 (14:03:31 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 26 July 2020 / Approved: 27 July 2020 / Online: 27 July 2020 (05:59:51 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Lansiaux, Édouard*; Pébaÿ, Philippe P. PhD†; Picard, Jean-Laurent MSc‡; Forget, Joachim MD, PhD§ Meta-analysis: COVID-19 Disease Severity Correlates With Smoking Status, Clinical Pulmonary Medicine: July 2020 - Volume 27 - Issue 4 - p 99-104 doi: 10.1097/CPM.0000000000000364 Lansiaux, Édouard*; Pébaÿ, Philippe P. PhD†; Picard, Jean-Laurent MSc‡; Forget, Joachim MD, PhD§ Meta-analysis: COVID-19 Disease Severity Correlates With Smoking Status, Clinical Pulmonary Medicine: July 2020 - Volume 27 - Issue 4 - p 99-104 doi: 10.1097/CPM.0000000000000364

Journal reference: Clinical Pulmonary Medecine 2020, 27, 99-104
DOI: 10.1097/CPM.0000000000000364

Abstract

The novel COVID-19 disease is a contagious acute respiratory infectious disease whose causative agent has been demonstrated to be a new virus of the coronavirus family, SARS- CoV-2. Multiple studies have already reported that risk factors for severe disease include older age and the presence of at least one of several underlying health conditions. However, a recent physiopathological report and the French COVID-19 scientific council have postulated a protective effect of tobacco smoking. Thanks to a meta-analysis, we have been able to demonstrate the statistical significance in this regard of twelve series from China, France and in the US, reporting three different smoking status (current smoker,former smoker, with a smoking history) as well as disease severity (with respectively odds-ratio of 1.78 [1.08-3.10], 4.60 [3.13-7.17], 2.74 [0.63-5.89]). Subsequently and using a Bayesian approach we have established that past, and present smoking is associated with more severe COVID-19 outcomes. Finally, we refute claims linking general population smoking status (N=O(10^8) or O(10^9)) to much smaller disease course series (N=O(10^4)). The latter point in particular is presented to stimulate academic discussion, and must be further investigated by well-designed studies.

Subject Areas

COVID-19; Coronavirus; Respiratory Distress; Tobacco Smoking; Correlation Statistics; Conditional Probability; Regression; China; U.S.A.

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 27 July 2020
Commenter: Edouard Lansiaux
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: A major review to turn it into a meta-analysis
+ Respond to this comment

We encourage comments and feedback from a broad range of readers. See criteria for comments and our diversity statement.

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 1
Metrics 0


×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.
We use cookies on our website to ensure you get the best experience.
Read more about our cookies here.