Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

“Doing my profession is also part of worship”: How Clinical Psychologists Address Aspects of Spirituality and Religion in Indonesia

Version 1 : Received: 1 July 2019 / Approved: 2 July 2019 / Online: 2 July 2019 (09:39:40 CEST)

How to cite: Liem, A. “Doing my profession is also part of worship”: How Clinical Psychologists Address Aspects of Spirituality and Religion in Indonesia. Preprints 2019, 2019070037 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0037.v1). Liem, A. “Doing my profession is also part of worship”: How Clinical Psychologists Address Aspects of Spirituality and Religion in Indonesia. Preprints 2019, 2019070037 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201907.0037.v1).

Abstract

This study aimed to explore how Indonesian clinical psychologists (CPs) address aspects of spirituality and religion (SR), particularly their attitudes towards and experience of it, on the mental health context. Semi-structured interviews were conducted with 43 CPs in public health centres in Yogyakarta Province, Indonesia. Data were anyalsed using deductive thematic analysis and they generated ten sub-themes which were merged into three central themes. The first theme was experiences related to SR, particularly in Indonesian sociocultural context. The second theme concentrated on participants’ clinical experience related to SR integration into clinical practice. The last theme highlighted the effort made by participants to create holistic mental health services. The originality of this study was represented by the interview quote in the title, “Doing my profession is also part of worship”. It was found that SR is part of culture and belief among Indonesian people, including CPs and mental health treatment clients. In summary, participants genuinely acknowledged that they were not able to completely detach SR from their professional practice. However, participants also pointed out that they were different with spiritual-religious healers (SRHs) and favourably welcomed future collaboration with credible SRHs. This positive attitude embodied a holistic care approach that recognises the diverse biopsycho-social-spiritual needs of clients. Therefore, professional organisations and psychology faculties should establish regulations and education of SR in psychology curricula and conventional psychotherapy to achieve this holistic mental health services in Indonesia.

Subject Areas

clinical psychology; cultural psychology; ethic and professionalism; holistic medicine; qualitative methods

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