Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Illegal Hunting of Prey Species in the Northern Section of Bardia National Park, Nepal: Implications for Carnivore Conservation

  1. Department of National Parks & Willdlife Conservation, Kathmandu 860, Nepal
  2. Applied and Biomedical Sciences, Federation University, Mount Helen VIC 3350, Australia
  3. National Trust for Nature Conservation, Lalitpur 3712, Nepal
Version 1 : Received: 1 November 2016 / Approved: 2 November 2016 / Online: 2 November 2016 (07:03:29 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Bhattarai, B.R.; Wright, W.; Khatiwada, A.P. Illegal Hunting of Prey Species in the Northern Section of Bardia National Park, Nepal: Implications for Carnivore Conservation. Environments 2016, 3, 32. Bhattarai, B.R.; Wright, W.; Khatiwada, A.P. Illegal Hunting of Prey Species in the Northern Section of Bardia National Park, Nepal: Implications for Carnivore Conservation. Environments 2016, 3, 32.

Journal reference: Environments 2016, 3, 32
DOI: 10.3390/environments3040032

Abstract

We interviewed 48 people including local communities, ex hunters and protected area management professionals. The purpose of the interviews was to understand the motivations for, and the nature of, illegal hunting of prey species of iconic predators - tigers and leopards - in the northern section of Bardia National Park. Participants reported that hunting of prey species occurs mostly in spring and autumn and is less common during the summer. In the past, hunting was primarily for the purposes of obtaining meat for household consumption. Since the introduction of a road network in the region, opportunities to sell wild meat at ad-hoc ‘highway markets’ have developed. The purported medicinal properties of wild meat was also cited as a driver for illegal hunting. Mostly, locally hand-made guns are used for hunting and the use of dogs in hunting was often reported. Protected area managers informed that illegal hunting problems in the study area are associated with a lack of presence of park authorities, remoteness and underdevelopment and poverty of the community. Our study suggested that skills development training for local community members might reduce dependency on wild meat for household consumption and earning thereby reducing illegal hunting.

Subject Areas

Bardia; carnivore; illegal hunting; prey; wild meat

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