Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Uncovering Spatio-Temporal and Treatment-Derived Differences in the Molecular Physiology of a Model Coral-Dinoflagellate Mutualism with Multivariate Statistical Approaches

  1. National Museum of Marine Biology and Aquarium, Checheng, Pingtung 944, Taiwan
  2. Living Oceans Foundation, Annapolis, MD 21403, USA
Version 1 : Received: 10 August 2016 / Approved: 11 August 2016 / Online: 11 August 2016 (11:03:03 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Mayfield, A.B. Uncovering Spatio-Temporal and Treatment-Derived Differences in the Molecular Physiology of a Model Coral-Dinoflagellate Mutualism with Multivariate Statistical Approaches. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2016, 4, 63. Mayfield, A.B. Uncovering Spatio-Temporal and Treatment-Derived Differences in the Molecular Physiology of a Model Coral-Dinoflagellate Mutualism with Multivariate Statistical Approaches. J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2016, 4, 63.

Journal reference: J. Mar. Sci. Eng. 2016, 4, 63
DOI: 10.3390/jmse4030063

Abstract

Multivariate statistical approaches (MSA), such as principal components analysis and multidimensional scaling, seek to uncover meaningful patterns within datasets by considering multiple response variables in a concerted fashion. Although these techniques are readily used by ecologists to visualize and explain differences between study sites, they could theoretically be employed to differentiate organisms within an experimental framework while simultaneously identifying response variables that drive documented experimental differences. Therefore, MSA were used herein to attempt to understand the response of the common, Indo-Pacific reef coral Seriatopora hystrix to temperature changes using data from laboratory-based temperature challenge studies performed in Southern Taiwan. Gene expression and physiological data partitioned experimental specimens by time of sampling, treatment temperature, and site of origin upon employing MSA, signifying that S. hystrix and its dinoflagellate endosymbionts display physiological and molecular signatures that are characteristic of sampling time, site of colony origin, and/or temperature regime. These findings promote the utility of MSA for documenting biologically meaningful shifts in the physiological and/or sub-cellular response of marine invertebrates exposed to environmental change.

Subject Areas

acclimation; coral reefs; endosymbiosis; molecular biology; multivariate statistics; temperature; upwelling

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