Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Conservation Benefits of Tropical Multifunctional Landscapes in and Around a Forest Protected Area of Bangladesh

  1. Tropical Forestry Group, School of Agriculture and Food Sciences, The University of Queensland, Brisbane QLD 4072, Australia
  2. Tropical Forests and People Research Centre, University of the Sunshine Coast, Maroochydore QLD 4558, Australia
  3. Centre for Research on Land-use Sustainability, Maijdi 3800, Bangladesh
  4. Department of Forestry and Environmental Science, School of Agriculture and Mineral Sciences, Shahjalal University of Science and Technology, Sylhet 3114, Bangladesh
Version 1 : Received: 19 November 2016 / Approved: 21 November 2016 / Online: 21 November 2016 (07:06:05 CET)

How to cite: Mukul, S.; Saha, N. Conservation Benefits of Tropical Multifunctional Landscapes in and Around a Forest Protected Area of Bangladesh. Preprints 2016, 2016110104 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0104.v1). Mukul, S.; Saha, N. Conservation Benefits of Tropical Multifunctional Landscapes in and Around a Forest Protected Area of Bangladesh. Preprints 2016, 2016110104 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0104.v1).

Abstract

Competing interests in land for agriculture and commodity production in tropical human-dominated landscapes make forests and biodiversity conservation particularly challenging. Establishment of protected area in this regard is not functioning as expected due to exclusive ecological focus and poor recognition of local people’s traditional forest use and dependence. In recent years, multifunctional landscapes such as agroforestry have widely been promoted as an efficient land-use in such circumstances, although their conservation effectiveness remains poorly investigated. We undertake a rapid biodiversity survey to understand the conservation value of four contrasting forms of local land-use, namely - betel leaf (Piper betel) agroforestry, lemon (Citrus limon) agroforestry, pineapple (Ananus comosus) agroforestry, and shifting cultivation fallow managed largely by the indigenous communities in and around a highly diverse forest protected area of Bangladesh. We measure the alpha and beta diversity of plants, birds, and mammals in these multifunctional landscapes as well as in the old-growth forest in the area. Our study finds local land-use critical in conserving biodiversity in the area, with comparable biodiversity benefits as those of the old-growth forest. In Bangladesh, where population pressure and rural people’s dependence on forests are common, multifunctional landscapes in areas of high conservation priority could potentially be used to bridge the gap between conservation and commodity production, ensuring that the ecological integrity of such landscapes will be altered as little as possible.

Subject Areas

biodiversity conservation; agroforestry; traditional land use; land sparing; land sharing; wildlife

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