Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications

  1. 3D Printing Medical Research Center, China Medical University Hospital, China Medical University, Taichung City 40402, Taiwan
  2. School of Dentistry, China Medical University, Taichung City 40402, Taiwan
  3. Department of Bioinformatics and Medical Engineering, Asia University, Taichung City 41354, Taiwan
  4. School of Medicine, College of Medicine, China Medical University, Taichung 40402, Taiwan
  5. Graduate Institute of Biomedical Sciences, China Medical University, Taichung City 40402, Taiwan
Version 1 : Received: 30 November 2016 / Approved: 30 November 2016 / Online: 30 November 2016 (04:28:15 CET)

How to cite: Shie, M.; Chang, W.; Wei, L.; Huang, Y.; Chen, C.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Y. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications. Preprints 2016, 2016110150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0150.v1). Shie, M.; Chang, W.; Wei, L.; Huang, Y.; Chen, C.; Chen, Y.; Shen, Y. 3D Printing of Cytocompatible Water-Based Light-Cured Polyurethane with Hyaluronic Acid for Cartilage Tissue Engineering Applications. Preprints 2016, 2016110150 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0150.v1).

Abstract

Diseases in articular cartilages have affected millions of people globally. Although the biochemical and cellular composition of articular cartilages is relatively simple, there is the limitation in self-repair ability of cartilage. Therefore, developing the strategies for cartilage repair is very important. Here, we reported a new manufacturing process of water-based polyurethane based photosensitive materials with hyaluronic acid and applied the materials for 3D printed customized cartilage scaffolds. The scaffold has high cytocompatibility and is one that closely mimics the mechanical properties of articular cartilages. It is suitable for culturing human Wharton's jelly mesenchymal stem cells (hWJMSCs) and the cells showed an excellent chondrogenic differentiation capacity. We consider that the 3D printing hybrid scaffolds may have potential in customized tissue engineering and facilitate the development of cartilage tissue engineering.

Subject Areas

water-based polyurethane; hyaluronic acid; cartilage tissue engineering; scaffold

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