Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Vitamin-D Deficiency Predicts Infections in Young North Indian Children: A Secondary Data Analysis

  1. Centre for Health Research and Development, Society for Applied Studies, New Delhi 110016, India
  2. National Science Professor, Indian Institute Technology, Delhi 110016, India
  3. Chair, Knowledge Integration and Translational Platform (KnIT), Biotechnology Industry Research Assistance Council (BIRAC), New Delhi 110003, India
  4. Department of Research, Innlandet Hospital Trust, 2381, Norway
  5. Centre for International Health, University of Bergen, Bergen 5020, Norway
Version 1 : Received: 7 November 2016 / Approved: 8 November 2016 / Online: 8 November 2016 (10:40:34 CET)

How to cite: Chowdhury, R.; Taneja, S.; Bhandari, N.; Sinha, B.; Upadhyay, R.; Bhan, M.; Strand, T. Vitamin-D Deficiency Predicts Infections in Young North Indian Children: A Secondary Data Analysis. Preprints 2016, 2016110049 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0049.v1). Chowdhury, R.; Taneja, S.; Bhandari, N.; Sinha, B.; Upadhyay, R.; Bhan, M.; Strand, T. Vitamin-D Deficiency Predicts Infections in Young North Indian Children: A Secondary Data Analysis. Preprints 2016, 2016110049 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0049.v1).

Abstract

Recent studies have demonstrated a relationship between poor vitamin D status and respiratory infections and diarrhea among young children. Acute lower respiratory infections (ALRI) and diarrhea are among the two most important causes of death in under-5 children. In this analysis, we examine the extent to which vitamin-D deficiency (<10 ng/ml) predicts these outcomes using data from a randomized controlled trial (RCT) of daily folic acid and/ or vitamin B12 supplementation for six months in 6 to 30 months old children conducted in Delhi, India. Of the 960 subjects who had vitamin-D concentrations measured, 331(34.5%) were vitamin-D deficient. We found, after controlling for relevant potential confounders (age, sex, breastfeeding status, wasting, stunting, underweight, anemia status at base line and season), the risk of ALRI was significantly higher among vitamin-D deficient (OR 1.26; 95% CI: 1.03 to 1.55) compared to vitamin-D-replete children in the six months follow-up period. Vitamin-D status was not significantly associated with episodes of diarrhea and clinical pneumonia. The extent of causal relationship of vitamin-D status and ALRI needs to be explored in further studies.

Subject Areas

vitamin-D deficiency; ALRI; Indian children

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