Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Two Genetic Codes: Repetitive Syntax for Active non-Coding RNAs; non-Repetitive Syntax for the DNA Archives

  1. Telos - Philosophische Praxis, Vogelsangstrasse 18c, 5111-Buermoos, Austria
Version 1 : Received: 11 October 2016 / Approved: 12 October 2016 / Online: 12 October 2016 (10:58:59 CEST)

How to cite: Witzany, G. Two Genetic Codes: Repetitive Syntax for Active non-Coding RNAs; non-Repetitive Syntax for the DNA Archives. Preprints 2016, 2016100041 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201610.0041.v1). Witzany, G. Two Genetic Codes: Repetitive Syntax for Active non-Coding RNAs; non-Repetitive Syntax for the DNA Archives. Preprints 2016, 2016100041 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201610.0041.v1).

Abstract

Current knowledge of the RNA world indicates two different genetic codes being present throughout the living world. In contrast to non-coding RNAs that are built of repetitive nucleotide syntax, the sequences that serve as templates for proteins share – as main characteristics – a non-repetitive syntax. The differences in their syntax structure is coherent with the difference of the functions they represent. Whereas non-coding RNAs build groups that serve as regulatory tools in nearly all genetic processes, the coding sections represent the evolutionarily successful function of the genetic information storage medium. The DNA genomes themselves are rather inactive, whereas the non-coding RNA domain is highly active, even as non-random genetic innovation operators. This indicates that repetitive syntax is the essential pre-requisite for RNA interactions to install variable RNA-group-identities, whereas the non-repetitive syntax serves as a stable conservation tool for successful selection processes out of RNA-groups cooperation and competition. The interaction opportunities of RNA loops with repetitive syntax are higher than with non-repetitive ones. Interestingly, these two genetic codes resemble the function of all natural languages, i.e., (a) everyday language use for organization and coordination of biotic group behavior, and (b) artificial (instrumental) language use for conservation of blueprints for complex protein-body constructions.

Subject Areas

RNA; DNA; Repetitive sequences; RNA stem loops; RNA group identities

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