Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Ethnic Differences in the Food Intake Patterns and Its Association Factors of Adolescents in Malaysia

  1. Programme of Nutrition, School of Health Sciences, Universiti Sains Malaysia, Health Campus, Kubang Kerian 16150, Kelantan, Malaysia
  2. Department of Health Science, Faculty of Sport Science and Coaching, Universiti Pendidikan Sultan Idris, Proton City, Tanjung Malim 35900, Perak, Malaysia
  3. School of Biosciences, Taylor's University lakeside campus, 47500 Subang Jaya, Selangor, Malaysia
Version 1 : Received: 4 September 2016 / Approved: 5 September 2016 / Online: 5 September 2016 (14:46:56 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Abdullah, N.-F.; Teo, P.S.; Foo, L.H. Ethnic Differences in the Food Intake Patterns and Its Associated Factors of Adolescents in Kelantan, Malaysia. Nutrients 2016, 8, 551. Abdullah, N.-F.; Teo, P.S.; Foo, L.H. Ethnic Differences in the Food Intake Patterns and Its Associated Factors of Adolescents in Kelantan, Malaysia. Nutrients 2016, 8, 551.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2016, 8, 551
DOI: 10.3390/nu8090551

Abstract

Abstract: Objective: The aim of the study was to identify dietary patterns and its association with socio-economic, dietary and lifestyle practices among adolescents in Malaysia. Methods: A validated food frequency questionnaire was used to assess dietary patterns. Results: Multivariate analyses show that age and physical activity (PA) levels were emerged as positive determinants of healthy-based food pattern in Malay (All, p<0.001), whereas higher consumption of eating-out from home (EatOut) and fast food (All, p<0.05) were negative determinants. High weekly breakfast skipping (p<0.001) and EatOut (p<0.01) were positively associated with a western-based pattern, whereas age (p<0.001) and household income (p<0.05) were negative determinants. Higher frequency of daily snacking (p<0.05) was emerged as positive determinant of local-based food pattern. For Chinese adolescents, age (p<0.001), PA levels (p<0.001) and maternal education level (p<0.05) emerged as positive determinants for the healthy-based pattern, whereas high EatOut and fast food intakes (All, p<0.01) were negative determinants. Higher weekly consumption of EatOut (p<0.01), fast food (p<0.05) and carbonated beverages (p<0.05), and daily snacking practice (p<0.01) were positively associated with higher western-based food pattern, whereas age (p<0.01) was inversely associated. Conclusion: These findings suggest that unhealthy dietary and lifestyle practices could increase the risk of adherence to unhealthy western-based food pattern that is high in fat, sugar and salt contents, and consequently increase the risk of developing obesity and metabolic-related disorders during these critical years of growth.

Subject Areas

dietary patterns, food-frequency questionnaire, dietary, lifestyle practices, adolescents

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