Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Mechanical and Microstructural Characteristics of the Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials

  1. Mining & Mineral Resources Division, Department of Business Administration, Chinalco China Copper Corporation Limited, Beijing 100082, China
  2. Department of Mining and Materials Engineering, McGill University, Montreal, QC H3A 0C5, Canada
Version 1 : Received: 27 August 2016 / Approved: 29 August 2016 / Online: 29 August 2016 (10:46:01 CEST)

How to cite: Zhang, W. Mechanical and Microstructural Characteristics of the Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials. Preprints 2016, 2016080220 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0220.v1). Zhang, W. Mechanical and Microstructural Characteristics of the Fiber-Reinforced Composite Materials. Preprints 2016, 2016080220 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0220.v1).

Abstract

Composite fiber materials are superior materials due to their high strength and light weight. Composites reflect the properties of their constituents, which is proportional to the volume fraction of each phase. There are different fiber reinforcement types and each affects it’s flexural, tensile and compression strength. When selecting a composite for a specific application, the forces excreted on the composite must be known in order to determine the reinforcement type. Unidirectional fiber reinforcement will allow very strong load resistance but only in one direction where as a random orientated fiber reinforcement can resist less load but can maintain this quota in all directions. These materials are said to be anisotropic. Certain composite fibers, taking into consideration there weights, are physically stronger than conventional metals. This research deals with the analysis of three composite materials with different reinforcement types, volume fraction and phase content. It was found that material A (glass epoxy) was the strongest in the longitudinal direction with a flexural strength of 534 MPa in the longitudinal and 420 MPa in the transverse direction. The flexural stresses of material B (glass silicone) and material C (glass polyester) where both found in the 120 to 135 MPa range. Differences were due to their differences in matrix composition and reinforcement type.

Subject Areas

composite fibers; flexural strength; polyester matrix; reinforcement

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