Preprint Review Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Current Understanding on Tail Regeneration in Green Anoles (Anolis carolinensis)

  1. Department of Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faculty of Applied Science and Technology, Islamic University, Kushtia 7003, Bangladesh
Version 1 : Received: 19 August 2016 / Approved: 23 August 2016 / Online: 23 August 2016 (11:25:42 CEST)

How to cite: Nain, Z.; Islam, M.; Chowdhury, S.; Afroza, S. Current Understanding on Tail Regeneration in Green Anoles (Anolis carolinensis). Preprints 2016, 2016080195 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0195.v1). Nain, Z.; Islam, M.; Chowdhury, S.; Afroza, S. Current Understanding on Tail Regeneration in Green Anoles (Anolis carolinensis). Preprints 2016, 2016080195 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0195.v1).

Abstract

Regeneration of lost tail is of great importance to lizards. Anolis carolinensis, a green lizard, is capable of regenerating its tail efficiently after autotomy. Hence, it is considered as a model organism in regeneration study. A. carolinensis shed its tail in order to distract the predator’s attention and thus makes a way to escape. Restoring of the amputated tail takes several days and the mechanism is currently clearly understood. Although save its life, tail regeneration is associated with the impairment of several vital functions in Anoles. In addition, various differences have been observed between original and regenerated tail in terms of mechanism and structure. To date, very little work has been conducted on tail autotomy and regeneration at molecular and genetic level. The genes responsible for regeneration in anoles are identified recently. These genes are evolutionarily conserved through all tetrapod vertebrates. They are, however, in a state of ‘switched-off’ in other vertebrates including humans. Consequently, a throughout study of these so called ‘switched-off’ genes may provide a way of restoring lost organs in human, and thus could revolutionize the modern medical science.

Subject Areas

green anole; tail autotomy; regeneration; microRNAs; Anolis carolinensis

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