Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography as Complementary Methods for the Analysis of Beer Samples

  1. Department of Chemistry Biochemistry & Physics, Marist College, 3399 North Road, Poughkeepsie, NY 12601, USA
  2. Process NMR Associates, 87A Sand Pit Road, Danbury, CT 06810, USA
Version 1 : Received: 10 August 2016 / Approved: 11 August 2016 / Online: 11 August 2016 (11:04:58 CEST)

How to cite: Johnson, S.; Soprano, S.; Wickham, L.; Fitzgerald, N.; Edwards, J. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography as Complementary Methods for the Analysis of Beer Samples. Preprints 2016, 2016080117 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0117.v1). Johnson, S.; Soprano, S.; Wickham, L.; Fitzgerald, N.; Edwards, J. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance and Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction Gas Chromatography as Complementary Methods for the Analysis of Beer Samples. Preprints 2016, 2016080117 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0117.v1).

Abstract

Chemical analysis of the organic components in beers has applications to quality control, authenticity and improvements to the flavor characteristics and brewing process. This study aims to show the complementary nature of two instrumental techniques which in combination can identify and quantify the majority of organic components in a beer sample. Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) was used to provide concentrations of twenty five different organic compounds including alcohols, organic acids, carbohydrates, and amino acids. Calorie content was also estimated for the samples. NMR data for ethanol concentrations were validated by comparison to a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometry (FTIR) method. Headspace Solid-Phase Microextraction (SPME) Gas Chromatography Mass Spectrometry (GCMS) was used to identify a range of volatile compounds such as alcohols, esters and hop derived aroma compounds. A simple and inexpensive conversion of a Gas Chromatography Flame Ionization Detector (GC FID) instrument to allow the use of Solid-Phase Microextraction was found to be useful for the quantification of volatile esters.

Subject Areas

beer; nuclear magnetic resonance; solid-phase microextraction; gas chromatography

Readers' Comments and Ratings (0)

Discuss and rate this article
Views 140
Downloads 151
Comments 0
Metrics 0
Discuss and rate this article

×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.