Preprint Review Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Specificity in Legume-Rhizobia Symbioses

  1. Faculty of Agriculture and Life Sciences, Lincoln University, PO Box 84, Lincoln 7647, New Zealand
Version 1 : Received: 1 August 2016 / Approved: 1 August 2016 / Online: 1 August 2016 (12:08:36 CEST)

How to cite: Andrews, M.; Andrews, M. Specificity in Legume-Rhizobia Symbioses. Preprints 2016, 2016080005 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0005.v1). Andrews, M.; Andrews, M. Specificity in Legume-Rhizobia Symbioses. Preprints 2016, 2016080005 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0005.v1).

Abstract

The Leguminosae (legume family) is divided into three sub-families, the Caesalpiniodeae, Mimosoideae and Papilionoideae. Here, the literature on legume-rhizobia symbioses was reviewed, and genotypically characterised rhizobia related to the taxonomy of the legumes they were isolated from. Only data from field soils were considered. The objective of the work was to assess to what extent legume specificity for rhizobial symbiont is related to legume taxonomy. Bradyrhizobium spp. were the exclusive rhizobial symbionts of species in the Caesalpinioideae but data are limited. Where tested, species within the two Mimosoideae tribes, Ingeae and Mimoseae were nodulated by different rhizobial genera. Generally, Papilionoideae species with indeterminate nodules were promiscuous in relation to rhizobial symbionts but high specificity for rhizobial partners appears to hold at tribe level for the Fabeae (Rhizobium spp.), genus level for Medicago (Ensifer spp.), Cytisus (Bradyrhizobium spp.) and Lupinus (Bradyrhizobium spp.), and species level for Galega spp. (Neorhizobium galegeae), Hedysarum coronarium (Rhizobium sullae), Cicer arietinum (Mesorhizobium spp.) and New Zealand native Sophora spp. (Mesorhizobium spp.). High legume specificity for rhizobial symbionts was linked to specific rhizobial symbiosis genes. For Papilionoideae species with determinate nodules, the Dalbergieae were primarily nodulated by Bradyrhizobium but were promiscuous with respect to Bradyrhizobium spp. while those in the Desmodieae, Phaseoleae, Psoraleae and Loteae were promiscuous across different rhizobial genera. Possible advantages and disadvantages of high specificity or promiscuity are discussed.

Subject Areas

Leguminosae; N2 fixation; nodulation

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