Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

ACTonFood. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Group Treatment Compared to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Group Treatment for Weight Maintenance: An Individually Randomized Group Treatment Trial

Version 1 : Received: 2 July 2021 / Approved: 6 July 2021 / Online: 6 July 2021 (13:38:20 CEST)

How to cite: Cattivelli, R.; Guerrini Usubini, A.; Manzoni, G.M.; Vailati Riboni, F.; Pietrabissa, G.; Musetti, A.; Franceschini, C.; Varallo, G.; Spatola, C.A.; Giusti, E.; Castelnuovo, G.; Molinari, E. ACTonFood. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Group Treatment Compared to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Group Treatment for Weight Maintenance: An Individually Randomized Group Treatment Trial. Preprints 2021, 2021070156 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0156.v1). Cattivelli, R.; Guerrini Usubini, A.; Manzoni, G.M.; Vailati Riboni, F.; Pietrabissa, G.; Musetti, A.; Franceschini, C.; Varallo, G.; Spatola, C.A.; Giusti, E.; Castelnuovo, G.; Molinari, E. ACTonFood. Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-Based Group Treatment Compared to Cognitive Behavioral Therapy-Based Group Treatment for Weight Maintenance: An Individually Randomized Group Treatment Trial. Preprints 2021, 2021070156 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202107.0156.v1).

Abstract

The purpose of this Individually Randomized Group Treatment Trial was to compare an Acceptance and Commitment Therapy-based (ACT) group intervention and a Cog-nitive Behavioral Therapy-based (CBT) group intervention for weight loss maintenance in a sample of adult patients with obesity seeking treatment for weight loss. 155 over-weight adults (BMI: Kg/m2= 43.8[6.8]) attending a multidisciplinary rehabilitation program for weight loss were randomized into two conditions: ACT and CBT. Demo-graphical, physical, and clinical data were assessed at the beginning of the program (t0), at discharge (t1), and at 6-month follow-up (t2). The following measures were ad-ministered: The Acceptance and Action Questionnaire-II (AAQ-II) and the Clinical Outcome in Routine Evaluation-Outcome Measure (CORE-OM). Generalized linear mixed models were performed to assess differences between groups. Moderation ef-fects for gender and eating disorders (ED) have been considered. From baseline to dis-charge no significant differences between interventions were found, with the only ex-ception of an improvement in the CORE-OM total score and in the CORE-OM subjective well-being subscale for those in the CBT condition. From discharge to follow-up ACT group participants showed significant results in terms of weight loss maintenance, CORE-OM total score, and CORE-OM and AAQ-II’s wellbeing, symptoms, and psy-chological problems subscales. Gender moderated the effects of time and intervention on the CORE-OM’ subscale reporting the risk for self-harm or harm others. The pres-ence of an eating disorder moderated the effect of time and intervention on the CORE-OM total score, on the CORE-Om’ symptoms and psychological problems sub-scales, and on the AAQ-II. Patients who received the ACT intervention were more likely to achieve a ≥5% weight loss from baseline to follow-up and to maintain the weight loss after discharge. The ACT intervention was thus effective in maintaining weight loss over time.

Subject Areas

obesity; obesity rehabilitation; weight maintenance; eating disorders; Acceptance and Commitment Therapy; Cognitive Behavioral Therapy; Clinical Psychology

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