Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Long-Term Pedigree Analysis: An Effective Tool for Managing Congenital Malformations in Cattle

Version 1 : Received: 25 March 2021 / Approved: 26 March 2021 / Online: 26 March 2021 (15:09:33 CET)

How to cite: Čítek, J.; Večerek, L.; Šlosárková, S.; Fleischer, P.; Schröffelová, D.; Kučera, J. Long-Term Pedigree Analysis: An Effective Tool for Managing Congenital Malformations in Cattle. Preprints 2021, 2021030671 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0671.v1). Čítek, J.; Večerek, L.; Šlosárková, S.; Fleischer, P.; Schröffelová, D.; Kučera, J. Long-Term Pedigree Analysis: An Effective Tool for Managing Congenital Malformations in Cattle. Preprints 2021, 2021030671 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0671.v1).

Abstract

This study aims to analyze the pedigrees of calves affected by one of three congenital defects: aplasia genitalis, atresia ani et recti and hernia cerebralis. The defects were diagnosed by veterinary surgeons in the Czech surveillance program for bovine genetic disorders. The sires fathering affected calves were born in the Czech Republic or imported from 1986-2001. The cases occurred on farms across the Czech Republic. The pedigree of each case was examined for common maternal and paternal ancestors (inbreeding loops) and for ancestors shared by other cases of the defect. The 13 calves affected by aplasia genitalis had common ancestors in all cases. The results indicate hereditary causation with recessive inheritance. Additionally, in atresia ani et recti, some of the pedigrees of 25 affected calves support hereditary causation, and repeating ancestors were found for 11 calves. In contrast, our analysis of 11 hernia cerebralis cases did not confirm the genetic background. We demonstrated that the pedigree analysis of congenital defects could help in controlling genetic health, although the final goal in terms of inherited defects is the description of causal genes and mutations. Measures to control sires that father affected calves should be appropriate under the current knowledge, which include culling or prudent use of breeding with the monitoring of descendants.

Subject Areas

genetic health; surveillance program; aplasia genitalis; atresia ani et recti; hernia cerebralis

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