Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Alters Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in the Developing chick

Version 1 : Received: 27 February 2021 / Approved: 2 March 2021 / Online: 2 March 2021 (12:28:49 CET)

How to cite: Parmar, B.; Verma, U.; Khaire, K.; Danes, D.; Balakrishnan, S. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Alters Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in the Developing chick. Preprints 2021, 2021030087 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0087.v1). Parmar, B.; Verma, U.; Khaire, K.; Danes, D.; Balakrishnan, S. Inhibition of Cyclooxygenase-2 Alters Cranial Neural Crest Cell Migration in the Developing chick. Preprints 2021, 2021030087 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202103.0087.v1).

Abstract

A recent study from our lab revealed that inhibition of cyclooxygenase-2 exclusively reduces the level of PGE2 amongst the prostanoids and hamper the normal development of several structures, strikingly the cranial vault, in chick embryos. In order to unearth the mechanism behind the deviant development of cranial features, the expression pattern of various factors that are known to influence the cranial neural crest cell (CNCC) migration were checked in chick embryo after inhibiting the COX-2 activity using etoricoxib. The compromised level of cell adhesion molecules and their upstream regulators, namely CDH1, CDH2, MSX1, and TGF-β, observed in the etoricoxib treated embryos indicate that COX-2, through its downstream effector PGE2, regulates the expression of these factors perhaps to aid the migration of CNCC. The histological features and levels of FoxD3 as well as PCNA further consolidates the role of COX-2 in migration and survival of CNCC in developing embryo. The results of the current study indicate that the COX-2 plays a pivotal role in orchestrating the proliferation and migration of CNCC during embryonic development of chick.

Subject Areas

Cranial neural crest cells; embryogenesis; development; cell migration

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