Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Climatic Sensitivity Profile of Abies Species – A Key to Their Future Role in the Adaptive Silviculture of Central-Southeast Europe

Version 1 : Received: 18 January 2021 / Approved: 19 January 2021 / Online: 19 January 2021 (14:05:20 CET)

How to cite: Mátyás, C.; Beran, F.; Dostál, J.; Čáp, J.; Fulín, M.; Vejpustková, M.; Božič, G.; Balázs, P.; Frýdl, J. Climatic Sensitivity Profile of Abies Species – A Key to Their Future Role in the Adaptive Silviculture of Central-Southeast Europe. Preprints 2021, 2021010385 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0385.v1). Mátyás, C.; Beran, F.; Dostál, J.; Čáp, J.; Fulín, M.; Vejpustková, M.; Božič, G.; Balázs, P.; Frýdl, J. Climatic Sensitivity Profile of Abies Species – A Key to Their Future Role in the Adaptive Silviculture of Central-Southeast Europe. Preprints 2021, 2021010385 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202101.0385.v1).

Abstract

Research Highlights: Adult grand fir displayed significantly faster growth and better resilience than native silver fir, tolerating the drastic reduction of annual rainfall at the provenance test. The reason is its adaptation to "Submediterranean-type” summer aridity at origin. When transferred to Central Europe, grand fir enjoys a substantial improvement of summer climate through higher rainfall, displaying its generally observed superiority. Background and Objectives: Published results of Frýdl and co-workers [1] were reanalyzed to assess resilience of fir species to summer drought stress. The primary aim was to detect the effects of transfer into changed climatic conditions, and less the within- and between-species adaptive differentiation shaped by past climates. Materials and Methods: Height growth of European and North American species was compared at adult age in three Czech provenance tests. Species profiles of climate sensitivity were estimated by comparing height response and climate transfer distance applying a Summer Aridity Index. Results: Silver fir showed relatively high sensitivity to summer aridity while the species A. cephalonica and A. borisii-regis were less sensitive but slower growing. Exposed to drastic climatic change, A. pinsapo and A. cilicica exhibited total mortality. The response of grand and noble fir provenances followed the pattern of sympatric Douglas fir. Grand fir surpassed native silver fir in growth and resilience. Conclusions: The sensitivity profile of fir species appears to be linked to adaptation to summer aridity at their origin, contrasting the recognition of rainfall in the wettest quarter as the best predictor. In the future, native silver fir will retreat from low-elevation, drought-exposed sites and will require silvicultural support. The introduction of Balkan firs may improve the stability of forest ecosystems. Grand fir may be considered for cautious introduction at higher elevations. When selecting provenances for future climate scenarios, the safeguarding of stability and resilience has first priority.

Subject Areas

common garden; climate change; provenance; silver fir; grand fir; Balkan firs; summer drought stress; resilience; climate transfer distance; adaptation

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