Preprint Article Version 1 Preserved in Portico This version is not peer-reviewed

Evaluation of Seasonal and Drought Conditions Effect on Satellite-based Precipitation Data Accuracy over Different Climatic Conditions

Version 1 : Received: 15 December 2020 / Approved: 17 December 2020 / Online: 17 December 2020 (12:07:27 CET)

How to cite: Qureshi, S.; Koohpayma, J.; Firozjaei, M.K.; Kakroodi, A.A. Evaluation of Seasonal and Drought Conditions Effect on Satellite-based Precipitation Data Accuracy over Different Climatic Conditions. Preprints 2020, 2020120433 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0433.v1). Qureshi, S.; Koohpayma, J.; Firozjaei, M.K.; Kakroodi, A.A. Evaluation of Seasonal and Drought Conditions Effect on Satellite-based Precipitation Data Accuracy over Different Climatic Conditions. Preprints 2020, 2020120433 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202012.0433.v1).

Abstract

Abstract: The Tropical Rainfall Measuring Mission (TRMM) and then Global Precipitation Mission (GPM) are the most important and widely used data sources in the forecasting of drought, flood, and water resources management. However, since this sensor’s data is primarily used for tropical regions, it is necessary to evaluate the accuracy for optimal use of the data across varying climatic and physiographic conditions. In this study, the accuracy of the satellite data for a span of 17 years (2000-2017) for three climatic zones has been explored using synoptic ground station data. The climates include a) arid and low rainfall, b) semi-arid and low rainfall, and c) humid and high rainfall. We evaluated satellite data accuracy in drought and wet conditions based on the Standard Precipitation Index (S.P.I.) and different seasons. For available ground control stations, 13 stations were used in the humid, seven stations in a semi-arid climate, and 12 stations in the dry climate. The results show that the monthly precipitation product of GPM (IMERG product) and TRMM (TMPA/3B43 product) overestimate the rainfall. In the arid climate, the precipitation is estimated 43%, in the semi-arid environment 50%, and in the humid weather 11% more than the ground-based data on average. Therefore, to use satellite data in different climates, it is necessary to make corrections to obtain precise results. Based on 32 ground stations, the correction coefficient has a positive relationship with average precipitation and altitude and an inverse relationship with the latitude. Further in-depth investigations showed that the accuracy of satellite data in wet conditions is higher than the accuracy of normal circumstances, and the accuracy of normal conditions is more accurate than drought conditions. Besides, the accuracy of satellite data in wet or dry conditions increases with increasing time scales. The highest accuracy was obtained for a 12-month time scale and the lowest accuracy for the 3-month time scale of drought conditions in the arid climate.

Subject Areas

Satellite precipitation; TRMM and GPM; Correction factor; S.P.I.; Different climates; rainfall precision

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