Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

What is the Real Shape of the Hubble Diagram, z = H0*D or z+1= eH0*t? Analysis of the SN1a Supernovae and Gamma Ray Burst Redshift/Magnitude Data including the High Redshift Range up to z = 8.1

Version 1 : Received: 22 May 2020 / Approved: 24 May 2020 / Online: 24 May 2020 (19:07:56 CEST)

How to cite: Marosi, L. What is the Real Shape of the Hubble Diagram, z = H0*D or z+1= eH0*t? Analysis of the SN1a Supernovae and Gamma Ray Burst Redshift/Magnitude Data including the High Redshift Range up to z = 8.1. Preprints 2020, 2020050400 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0400.v1). Marosi, L. What is the Real Shape of the Hubble Diagram, z = H0*D or z+1= eH0*t? Analysis of the SN1a Supernovae and Gamma Ray Burst Redshift/Magnitude Data including the High Redshift Range up to z = 8.1. Preprints 2020, 2020050400 (doi: 10.20944/preprints202005.0400.v1).

Abstract

Analyses of the Hubble diagrams are presented for SN1a supernovae and gamma ray bursts in the redshift ranges z = 0.01–1.3 and 0.034–8.1, respectively. Data are presented on the typical z/μ scale and also on the less common yet increasingly sensitive photon flight time t/(z+1) scale. The primary conclusion is that on the basis of the presently accessible data in the redshift range z = 0.01–8.1, the slope of the Hubble diagram is, or is extremely close to, exponential.

Subject Areas

galaxies; distances and redshift; high redshift; stars; Gamma ray bursts; individual; supernovae; individual; cosmology; distance scale; observations

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