Working Paper Article Version 2 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Associations of Physical Activity and Screen-Time with Mental Health in a Nationwide Sample of Kazakhstan Adolescents

Version 1 : Received: 14 August 2019 / Approved: 15 August 2019 / Online: 15 August 2019 (16:17:46 CEST)
Version 2 : Received: 19 September 2019 / Approved: 20 September 2019 / Online: 20 September 2019 (03:29:35 CEST)

How to cite: Ng, K.; Cosma, A.; Abdrakhmanova, S.; Adayeva, A. The Associations of Physical Activity and Screen-Time with Mental Health in a Nationwide Sample of Kazakhstan Adolescents. Preprints 2019, 2019080170 Ng, K.; Cosma, A.; Abdrakhmanova, S.; Adayeva, A. The Associations of Physical Activity and Screen-Time with Mental Health in a Nationwide Sample of Kazakhstan Adolescents. Preprints 2019, 2019080170

Abstract

Mental health problems during adolescence is a serious public health issue in the Republic of Kazakhstan. Early detection is necessary alongside population level monitoring. Physical inactivity (PA) and increased screen-time can be a risk factor for low well-being. The aim of this study was to examine the associations between PA and screen-time with well-being among young adolescents in Kazakhstan. Young adolescents (n=4,731) aged 11y, 13y, and 15y from the Republic of Kazakhstan took part in the World Health Organization (WHO) collaborative Health Behaviour in School-aged Children (HBSC) study. Respondents completed the WHO-5 Well-being scale, PA and screen-time. Internationally recommended cut-offs were used for analyses. Two adjusted models of binary logistic regressions were performed; PA (Model 1) and PA with screen-time (Model 2). The proportion of adolescents with good well-being reduced between 11y to 15y (boys, OR=0.66 CI=0.49-0.80; girls, OR=0.55, CI=0.43-0.71). Boys with daily PA were twice more likely, and girls 3.5 times more likely to report good well-being than inactive peers. More girls with low, than high, screen-time had positive well-being (OR=1.28, CI=1.04-1.59). Location between rural and urban was a significant factor. Daily PA can be protective of low well-being for both boys and girls. However, meeting reporting screen-time recommendations was only protective for girls and not boys. Designing and implementing positive well-being programmes require consideration of locality and amounts of PA and screen-time.

Subject Areas

WHO-5; well-being;school-aged children; HBSC study; rural; urban; locality

Comments (1)

Comment 1
Received: 20 September 2019
Commenter: Kwok Ng
Commenter's Conflict of Interests: Author
Comment: Subtle change to title;
Reduced words in the abstract. minor grammatical changes;
Changed STB to screen-time;
Provided more information about the measures;
Added p-values to the logistical regression table;
Moved table 1 to Appendix;
Added discussion about rural and urban findings;
Described more study limitations;
Wrote some conclusions about gender differences;
Added a few more references.
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