Preprint Review Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

The Protecting Role of Dormant Origins in Response to Replicative Stress

Version 1 : Received: 21 September 2018 / Approved: 21 September 2018 / Online: 21 September 2018 (16:00:30 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Courtot, L.; Hoffmann, J.-S.; Bergoglio, V. The Protective Role of Dormant Origins in Response to Replicative Stress. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 3569. Courtot, L.; Hoffmann, J.-S.; Bergoglio, V. The Protective Role of Dormant Origins in Response to Replicative Stress. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 3569.

Journal reference: Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 3569
DOI: 10.3390/ijms19113569

Abstract

Maintenance of the human chromosomes stability requires a tight regulation of DNA replication to duplicate once and only once the entire genome of a single cell. In mammalians cells, origin activation is controlled in space and time by a cell specific and robust program called replication timing. About 100 000 of potential origins are loaded onto the chromatin at the G1 phase but only 20-30% are selected and active during the replication of a given cell. When the replication fork is slowed down by exogenous or endogenous sources, the cell need to activate more origins to complete the replication on time. Thus, the large choice of origins that can be activated may be a key player in the protection of the genome. The aim of this review is to discuss about the role of these dormant origins as housekeepers of the human genome in response to replicative stress.

Subject Areas

Dormant origins; replicative stress; replication timing; DNA damage; genome instability; cancer

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