Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Dietary Cholesterol Intake and Sources among U.S Adults: Results from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), 2001–2014

Version 1 : Received: 22 May 2018 / Approved: 22 May 2018 / Online: 22 May 2018 (11:37:00 CEST)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Xu, Z.; McClure, S.T.; Appel, L.J. Dietary Cholesterol Intake and Sources among U.S Adults: Results from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), 2001–2014. Nutrients 2018, 10, 771. Xu, Z.; McClure, S.T.; Appel, L.J. Dietary Cholesterol Intake and Sources among U.S Adults: Results from National Health and Nutrition Examination Surveys (NHANES), 2001–2014. Nutrients 2018, 10, 771.

Journal reference: Nutrients 2018, 10, 771
DOI: 10.3390/nu10060771

Abstract

The 2015 Dietary Guidelines for Americans recommends that individuals should eat as little dietary cholesterol as possible. However, current dietary cholesterol intake and its food sources have not been well-characterized. We examined dietary cholesterol intake by age, sex, race, and food sources using 24-hour dietary recall data from a nationally representative sample of 5047 adults aged 20 years or older who participated in NHANES (2013–2014 survey cycle). We also reported trends in cholesterol intake across the past 7 NHANES surveys. Mean dietary cholesterol intake was 293 mg/day (348 mg/day for males and 242 mg/day for females) in the 2013–2014 survey cycle; 39% of adults had dietary cholesterol intake above 300 mg/day (46% for males and 28% for females). Meat, eggs, grain products, and milk were the highest four food sources of cholesterol, contributing to 96% of the total consumption. Both average cholesterol intake and food source varied by age, sex, and race (each p < 0.05). Mean cholesterol intake of the overall population had been relatively constant at ~290 mg/day from 2001–2002 to 2013–2014 (p-trend = 0.98). These results should inform public health efforts in implementing dietary guidelines and tailoring dietary recommendations.

Subject Areas

diet; cholesterol; NHANES-WWEIA; food groups

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