Preprint Article Version 1 This version is not peer-reviewed

Analysis of the Doping Control Test Results in Individual and Team Sports from 2003 to 2015

Version 1 : Received: 16 May 2018 / Approved: 17 May 2018 / Online: 17 May 2018 (12:05:15 CEST)

How to cite: Aguilar, M.; Muñoz-Guerra, J.; Plata, M.D.M.; Del Coso, J. Analysis of the Doping Control Test Results in Individual and Team Sports from 2003 to 2015. Preprints 2018, 2018050245 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0245.v1). Aguilar, M.; Muñoz-Guerra, J.; Plata, M.D.M.; Del Coso, J. Analysis of the Doping Control Test Results in Individual and Team Sports from 2003 to 2015. Preprints 2018, 2018050245 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201805.0245.v1).

Abstract

Previous investigations using questionnaires and personal interviews have found that the incidence of doping misconduct might be different among different sports disciplines. However, there is no sport-specific information about the proportion of adverse and atypical findings in samples used for doping control despite the objectivity of this analysis to analyse the use of banned substances among sports. The aim of the present investigation was to assess the differences in the frequency of adverse analytical and atypical findings among sports reported by WADA accredited laboratories. For this purpose, the Testing Figures Reports made available by the World Anti-Doping Agency from 2003 to 2015 were analysed, specifically to examine the number of samples and percentage of adverse/atypical findings in individual and team sports. A total of 1,347,213 samples were analysed from the individual sports selected for this investigation from 2003 to 2015 and 698,371 samples were analysed for disciplines catalogued as team sports. The individual sports with the highest proportion of adverse/atypical findings were cycling (3.3 ± 1.0%), weightlifting (3.0 ± 0.6%), and boxing (2.9 ± 0.6%), while the team sports with the highest proportion were ice hockey (2.2 ± 0.5%), rugby (2.0 ± 0.5%), and basketball (2.0 ± 0.5%). Sports such as gymnastics and skating had a proportion of adverse/atypical findings lower than 1.0% in the years studied. In conclusion, the incidence of adverse/atypical findings was not uniform across all sports disciplines. The different proportions of adverse/atypical findings among sports suggest a greater use of banned substances and methods related to sport-specific idiosyncrasy. This information may be valuable for national and international anti-doping organisations to detect sports with a higher risk of doping misconduct.

Subject Areas

elite athlete; attitude; type of sport; banned drugs; anti-doping

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