Preprint Article Version 1 This version not peer reviewed

Preparation of Fish Skin Gelatin-Based Nanofibers Incorporating Cinnamaldehyde by Solution Blow Spinning

Version 1 : Received: 23 January 2018 / Approved: 24 January 2018 / Online: 24 January 2018 (09:03:09 CET)

A peer-reviewed article of this Preprint also exists.

Liu, F.; Türker Saricaoglu, F.; Avena-Bustillos, R.J.; Bridges, D.F.; Takeoka, G.R.; Wu, V.C.H.; Chiou, B.-S.; Wood, D.F.; McHugh, T.H.; Zhong, F. Preparation of Fish Skin Gelatin-Based Nanofibers Incorporating Cinnamaldehyde by Solution Blow Spinning. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 618. Liu, F.; Türker Saricaoglu, F.; Avena-Bustillos, R.J.; Bridges, D.F.; Takeoka, G.R.; Wu, V.C.H.; Chiou, B.-S.; Wood, D.F.; McHugh, T.H.; Zhong, F. Preparation of Fish Skin Gelatin-Based Nanofibers Incorporating Cinnamaldehyde by Solution Blow Spinning. Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 618.

Journal reference: Int. J. Mol. Sci. 2018, 19, 618
DOI: 10.3390/ijms19020618

Abstract

Cinnamaldehyde, a natural preservative that can non-specifically deactivate foodborne pathogens, was successfully incorporated into fish skin gelatin (FSG) solutions and blow spun into uniform nanofibers. The effects of cinnamaldehyde ratios (5-30%, w/w FSG) on physicochemical properties of fiber-forming emulsions (FFEs) and their nanofibers were investigated. Higher ratios resulted in higher values in particle size and viscosity of FFEs, as well as higher values in diameter of nanofibers. Loss of cinnamaldehyde was observed during solution blow spinning (SBS) process and cinnamaldehyde was mainly located on the surface of resultant nanofibers. Nanofibers all showed antibacterial activity by direct diffusion and vapor release against Escherichia coli O157:H7, Salmonella typhimurium, and Listeria monocytogenes. Inhibition zones increased as cinnamaldehyde ratio increased. Nanofibers showed larger inhibition effects than films prepared by casting method when S. typhimurium was exposed to the released cinnamaldehyde vapor, although films had higher remaining cinnamaldehyde than nanofibers after preparation. Lower temperature was favorable for cinnamaldehyde retention, and nanofibers added with 10% cinnamaldehyde ratio showed the highest retention over eight-weeks of storage. Results suggest that FSG nanofibers can be prepared by SBS as carriers for antimicrobials.

Subject Areas

gelatin; nanofibers; cinnamaldehyde; solution blow spinning; antimicrobial activity

Readers' Comments and Ratings (0)

Leave a public comment
Send a private comment to the author(s)
Rate this article
Views 0
Downloads 0
Comments 0
Metrics 0
Leave a public comment

×
Alerts
Notify me about updates to this article or when a peer-reviewed version is published.