Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Multiple Disparities in Adult Mortality in Relation to Social and Health Care: Results from Different Data Sources

Version 1 : Received: 8 August 2016 / Approved: 8 August 2016 / Online: 8 August 2016 (12:01:28 CEST)

How to cite: Ranabhat, C.; Kim, C.; Park, M.; Kim, C.; Jeong, H.; Koh, S.; Chang, S. Multiple Disparities in Adult Mortality in Relation to Social and Health Care: Results from Different Data Sources. Preprints 2016, 2016080079 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0079.v1). Ranabhat, C.; Kim, C.; Park, M.; Kim, C.; Jeong, H.; Koh, S.; Chang, S. Multiple Disparities in Adult Mortality in Relation to Social and Health Care: Results from Different Data Sources. Preprints 2016, 2016080079 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201608.0079.v1).

Abstract

Background: Disparity in adult mortality (AM) with reference to social dynamics and health care has not been sufficiently examined. This study aimed to identify the gap in the understanding of AM in relation to religion, political stability, economic level, and universal health coverage (UHC). Methods: A cross-national study was performed with different sources of data, using the administrative record linkage theory. We created a new data set using data from the 2013 World Bank data catalogue by region, The Economist (Political instability index 2013), Stuckler David et al. (Universal health coverage, 2010), and religious categories of all UN country members. Descriptive statistics, a t-test, an ANOVA followed by a post hoc test, and a linear regression were used where applicable. Result: The average AM rate for males and females was 0.20 ± 0.10 and 0.14 ± 0.10, respectively. AM was significantly higher in economically weak countries, countries with political instability, countries with traditional religion, without achievement of UHC, and Sub-Saharan Africa (p<0.01). There was high disparity of AM between countries with and without UHC (F = male: 61.89, female: 51.85, p<0.001) and between groups with low and high income (F = male: 36.33, female: 42.39, p<0.001). UHC and political stability would significantly reduce AMR by > 0.41 in both sexes and high economic status would reduce male AMR by 0.44, and female AMR by 0.70, in relation to countries without UHC, with political instability, and low economic status. Conclusions: Disparities in AM can be reduced after the achievement of UHC and economically productive activities for those adults affected by conflict and political unrest.

Subject Areas

adult mortality; disparity; political instability; universal health coverage; cross-country study

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