Preprint Article Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

A Possible Role of an Interaction of the Age at Common Childhood Infections and Selected Dietary Factors at Young Age, for the Risk of Multiple Sclerosis

  1. Private neuro-epidemiologist Eulerweg 4, D-64347 Griesheim, Germany
  2. Neurologicum Darmstadt, Luisenplatz 1, D-64283 Darmstadt, Germany
  3. Neurologische Gemeinschaftspraxis, Hammergasse 1, D-64372 Ober-Ramstadt, Germany
Version 1 : Received: 21 November 2016 / Approved: 22 November 2016 / Online: 22 November 2016 (13:00:45 CET)

How to cite: Lauer, K.; Wahl, A.; Geilenkeuser, M. A Possible Role of an Interaction of the Age at Common Childhood Infections and Selected Dietary Factors at Young Age, for the Risk of Multiple Sclerosis. Preprints 2016, 2016110114 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0114.v1). Lauer, K.; Wahl, A.; Geilenkeuser, M. A Possible Role of an Interaction of the Age at Common Childhood Infections and Selected Dietary Factors at Young Age, for the Risk of Multiple Sclerosis. Preprints 2016, 2016110114 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0114.v1).

Abstract

An increased risk of multiple sclerosis (MS) had been found when individuals had consumed large amounts of processed meat and sausages at young age (Lauer, 2014). Furthermore it was found in many studies that MS patients had acquired a number of common childhood infections at higher ages than controls. Therefore, MS patients from an epidemiological long-term investigation in Germany and different hospital controls, were evaluated for a statistical interaction of these two factors. 324 MS patients and 242 hospital controls were inquired. The study focussed on age 0 - 16. Subjects were tested for additive interaction by multiple linear regression analysis (Knol et al., 2007). There was an additive interaction of the age at any common childhood infection with the consumption of scalded sausages (regression estimate = 0.1370; standard error = 0.0603; p = 0.0239). In contrast, no such interaction could be shown for: animal fats; smoked meat (e.g. ham and bacon); and cold - smoked German salami. Thus there was a synergy of the intake of scalded sausages (e.g. frankfurters, bolognas, etc.) and age at common childhood infections, for the later risk of MS.





Subject Areas

multiple sclerosis; epidemiology; diet; childhood infections; interaction

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