Preprint Review Version 1 NOT YET PEER-REVIEWED

Fostering Learning in Large Programmes and Portfolios: Emerging Lessons from Climate Change and Sustainable Development

  1. Overseas Development Institute, 203 Blackfriars Rd, London SE1 8NJ, UK
  2. Department for International Development, London SW1A 2EG, UK
  3. Department for Business, Energy & Industrial Strategy, London SW1H 0ET, UK
Version 1 : Received: 1 November 2016 / Approved: 1 November 2016 / Online: 1 November 2016 (09:45:20 CET)

How to cite: Harvey, B.; Pasanen, T.; Pollard, A.; Raybould, J. Fostering Learning in Large Programmes and Portfolios: Emerging Lessons from Climate Change and Sustainable Development. Preprints 2016, 2016110007 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0007.v1). Harvey, B.; Pasanen, T.; Pollard, A.; Raybould, J. Fostering Learning in Large Programmes and Portfolios: Emerging Lessons from Climate Change and Sustainable Development. Preprints 2016, 2016110007 (doi: 10.20944/preprints201611.0007.v1).

Abstract

In fields like climate and development, where the challenges being addressed can be described as “wicked”, learning is a key to successful programming. Though useful practical and theoretical work is being undertaken on the value of reflexive learning as a way of bringing together different knowledges to address the multiple dimensions of complex problems, the approaches that many of organisations are taking have failed to address the complexity and the cross-scalar nature of the challenges that are triggered by climate change. Through a review of practical cases and learning theories commonly used in the areas of resilience, adaptation and environmental management, this article: i) offers a theoretical framing on reflexive learning processes in large, highly-distributed climate change and resilience-building programmes for development, and ii) reviews key challenges and lessons emerging from early efforts to promote and integrate reflexive learning processes in programmes of this nature. Using a case study approach, the authors focus on early efforts made in four large, inter-related (or nested) programmes to establish, integrate and sustain learning processes and systems. Eight themes emerged from the review. By investigating how these themes play out in the nested programming, the paper contributes to the limited existing body of evidence on learning in large climate change programmes and identify areas where future efforts might focus.

Subject Areas

learning; climate change; resilience; programme design; reflective practice

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